Research

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Research Notes: Daniel Mochon and Janet Schwartz

August 05, 2015
Daniel Mochon Janet Schwartz

Daniel Mochon and Janet Schwartz's paper “Gain without pain: The extended effects of a behavioral health intervention” has been accepted for publication in Management Science. Financial incentive programs are an attractive way to for firms to help customers improve health behaviors such as better nutrition, increased exercise, better medication adherence and smoking cessation. While research from behavioral economics shows that these programs can improve a specific health behavior while financial incentives are in place, less is known about how they influence...

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Research Notes: Geoffrey Parker

July 17, 2015

Geoffrey Parker’s paper “Envelope Modeling of Renewable Resource Variability and Capacity,” co-authored with Xiaoyue Jiang of Tulane University’s Computer Science Department and Ekundayo Shittu of George Washington University, has been accepted for publication in Computers & Operations Research. Parker is the Norman Mayer Professor of Business and professor of management science at Tulane’s A. B. Freeman School of Business.

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Research Notes: Jennifer Merluzzi

June 26, 2015

Jennifer Merluzzi's paper “The Specialist Discount: Negative Returns for MBAs with Focused Profiles in Investment Banking,” co-authored with Damon Phillips of Columbia University, has been accepted for publication in Administrative Science Quarterly. Merluzzi is an assistant professor of management at Tulane University’s A. B. Freeman School of Business.

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Research Notes: Robert Hansen

May 26, 2015

Robert Hansen’s paper “Can analysts pick stocks for the long-run?” has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Financial Economics. The paper, co-authored with Oya Altınkılıç and Liyu Ye, examines stock return drift following analysts’ revisions of their stock recommendations. The paper finds that during the high-frequency algorithmic trading period of 2003-2010, the stock return drift is not significantly different from zero, overturning previous research findings. The authors’ new findings agree with improved market efficiency after declines in real trading cost...

Research Notes: Claire Senot

May 19, 2015

Claire Senot's paper “Role of Bottom-up Decision Processes in Improving Care Quality: A Contingency Perspective,” co-authored with Aravind Chandrasekaren and Peter Ward, has been accepted for publication in Production and Operations Management.  Senot is an assistant professor of management science at the Freeman School.

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Research Notes: Harish Sujan

May 06, 2015

Harish Sujan’s article “The Importance of Starting Right: The Influence of Accurate Intuition on Performance in Salesperson–Customer Interactions,” co-authored with Zachary R. Hall and Michael Ahearne, was published in the May 2015 issue of Journal of Marketing. In the article, the authors evaluate the influence of  accurate judgements by salespeople about customers in face-to-face interactions and argue that salespeople who make accurate intuitive judgements improve their selling performance by enabling more appropriate initial sales strategies. Sujan is the A. B. Freeman Chair of...

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Research Notes: Jennifer Merluzzi

May 05, 2015

Jennifer Merluzzi's paper “Unequal on top: Gender profiling and the income gap among high earner male and female professionals” has been accepted for publication in Social Science Research. In the paper, Merluzzi and co-author Stanislav D. Dobrev suggest that young women are routinely subjected to “gender profiling” by employers in which their potential contribution to the organization is interpreted through the lens of social stereotypes and cultural norms that attribute to them weaker labor market commitment than men. The end result of this profiling, the authors argue, is income...

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Research Notes: Emily Rosenzweig

April 28, 2015

Emily Rosenzweig’s paper “When Knowledge Knows No Bounds: Self-perceived Expertise Predicts Claims of Impossible Knowledge” has been accepted for publication in Psychological Science. The paper was co-authored with Stav Atir, PhD candidate at Cornell University, and David A. Dunning, professor of psychology at Cornell. Rosenzweig is an assistant professor of marketing at Tulane University’s A. B. Freeman School of Business.

Research Notes: Kelly Grant

April 14, 2015

Kelly Grant’s paper “Teaching Professional Communication in a Global Context: Using a Three-Phase Approach of Theory Exploration, Self-Assessment, and Virtual Simulation” has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Rhetoric, Professional Communication and Globalization. The paper, co-authored with Timo Lainema, Elizabeth Tuleja and Jeffrey Younger, will be published in a special issue of the journal, “Re-Imagining Professional Communication Pedagogy for the Globalized Classroom.”

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Research Notes: Daniel Mochon

March 30, 2015

Assistant Professor of Marketing Daniel Mochon received the Society for Consumer Psychology’s 2015 C.W. Park Outstanding Contribution to the Field Award for his paper “The IKEA effect: When labor leads to love.” The award was presented at the society’s winter 2015 conference in Phoenix.  The paper, which Mochon co-authored with Michael Norton and Dan Ariely, suggests that individuals attach greater value to products they create themselves than those products might objectively deserve. It originally appeared in the Journal of Consumer Psychology in 2012.

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Research Notes: Eric Hamerman

January 28, 2015

Eric Hamerman’s paper “Reliance on Luck: Identifying Which Achievement Goals Elicit Superstitious Behavior,” co-authored with Carey Morewedge, associate professor of marketing at Boston University School of Management, has been accepted for publication in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. In the paper, the authors find that people are more likely to turn to superstitions to achieve performance goals as opposed to learning goals. Performance goals are when people try to be judged as successful by others. They tend to be extrinsically motivated and are perceived to be...

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Research Notes: Paddy Sivadasan and Ira Solomon

January 16, 2015
Paddy Sivadasan Ira Solomon

Paddy Sivadasan and Ira Solomon’s paper “Audit fee residuals: costs or rents?” has been accepted for publication in the Review of Accounting Studies. The paper, co-authored with Rajib Dooger of the University of Washington-Bothell, suggests that fee residuals largely consist of researcher-unobserved audit production costs and are likely to be poor proxies for rents. This finding provides valuable guidance for how fee residuals should be used in future research, indicates promising avenues for future audit fee research, improves the ability to predict expected...